Part NCC & Non Commercial Aircraft Operations

Any non commercial operator with an aircraft registered within the EASA zone or with their principal place of business within any EASA member states will have to comply with part-NCC regulation by August 2016. Obtaining compliance with this new set of rules may be a daunting task for a small operators as they will be face with crucial choices that could have a significant impact on their operating costs.

About EASA regulations

Following operators are affected by EASA Air Operations Part-ORO, Part-NCC, and Part-SPA regulation and shall be compliant with the requirements on 25. August 2016:

  • Non-commercial operators of complex motor-powered aircraft registered in an EASA State and having the principal place of business in an EASA State.
  • Non-commercial operators of complex motor-powered aircraft registered in a non-EASA State but having their principal place of business (i.e. operator is established or residing) in an EASA State.

  • Non-commercial operators of complex motor-powered aircraft registered in an EASA State and having the aircraft based outside the EU. In such a case the operator shall approach the state of registry to obtain assistance on how to achieve compliance.
Note: The principal place of business is typically the place where the operations department is located, such as the operational control office or it may be the residence of the operator. Normally this is also the home base of the aircraft concerned.

What is a complex motor-powered aircraft?

An aeroplane:
  • with a maximum certificated take-off mass exceeding 5 700 kg, or
  • certificated for a maximum passenger seating configuration of more than nineteen, or
  • certificated for operation with a minimum crew of at least two pilots, or
  • equipped with (a) turbojet engine(s) or more than one turboprop* engine

A helicopter certificated:
  • for a maximum take-off mass exceeding 3 175 kg, or
  • for a maximum passenger seating configuration of more than nine, or
  • for operation with a minimum crew of at least two pilots, or
  • A tilt rotor aircraft.

"Complex" versus "non-complex" operator

EASA uses the term “complex” in diferent regulations with different meanings. The term “complex” motor-powered aircraft should not confused with the term complex operator or organisation. Although the same adjective is used by EASA, they have nothing in common.

An operator should be considered as a complex organization when it has a workforce of more than 20 FTEs involved in the activity subject to Regulation (EC) No 216/2008 and its Implementing Rules. Operators with up to 20 FTEs involved in the activity subject to Regulation (EC) No 216/2008 and its Implementing Rules may also be considered complex based on an assessment of the following factors:
  • in terms of complexity, the extent and scope of contracted activities subject to the approval;
  • in terms of risk criteria, whether any of the following are present:
  • operations requiring specific approvals, such as low visibility operations (LVO) or transport of dangerous goods (DG);
  • different types of aircraft used.